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Now, a year later, Gab has more than 240,000 users and has raised

Now, a year later, Gab has more than 240,000 users and has raised $1 million via crowdfunding, which it celebrated with a middle-finger tweet to “Silicon Valley elitist trash.” Branded with the face of Pepe, the anthropomorphic frog that has become the emblematic meme of the alt-right, Gab is a digital playpen for Nazis, white supremacists, men’s rights activists, anti-PC crusaders, Gamergaters, anti-feminists, free speech absolutists, and anyone who loves a solidly offensive joke.Notifications are sounded with the croak of a frog.The users feel their perspectives have few homes elsewhere on an internet shaped by the left-tilting values of Silicon Valley, the rejection of which has propelled Gab’s rise.That made Gab only the latest in a recent spate of online offings.S., or going to the dark web, a part of the internet where websites can be hosted anonymously but are only accessible via a special browser, like Tor (that’s one thing the Daily Stormer did after being banned).

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Now, a year later, Gab has more than 240,000 users and has raised $1 million via crowdfunding, which it celebrated with a middle-finger tweet to “Silicon Valley elitist trash.” Branded with the face of Pepe, the anthropomorphic frog that has become the emblematic meme of the alt-right, Gab is a digital playpen for Nazis, white supremacists, men’s rights activists, anti-PC crusaders, Gamergaters, anti-feminists, free speech absolutists, and anyone who loves a solidly offensive joke.

Notifications are sounded with the croak of a frog.

The users feel their perspectives have few homes elsewhere on an internet shaped by the left-tilting values of Silicon Valley, the rejection of which has propelled Gab’s rise.

That made Gab only the latest in a recent spate of online offings.

S., or going to the dark web, a part of the internet where websites can be hosted anonymously but are only accessible via a special browser, like Tor (that’s one thing the Daily Stormer did after being banned).

If these websites hope to be publicly accessible, they will also need to find hosting, as well as shielding from technical attacks, like DDo S protection.

Andrew Anglin, the publisher of the Daily Stormer, told in March that the majority of his site’s traffic comes from Santa Clara County, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

“The average alt-right-ist,” the white supremacist Richard Spencer told the magazine, “is probably a 28-year-old tech-savvy guy working in IT.” Utsav Sanduja, the chief operating officer of Gab, described the “Free Speech Tech Alliance” to me as “a group of 100 engineers plus from Silicon Valley who are working with us behind the scenes to create an alternative infrastructure.” The movement’s goal is to own its own servers and run its own web hosting, domain registrar, DDo S protection software, cloud storage services, and encryption technology, not to mention social networks like Gab and other “free-speech”–centric alternatives, like a You Tube replacement called Pew Tube.

million via crowdfunding, which it celebrated with a middle-finger tweet to “Silicon Valley elitist trash.” Branded with the face of Pepe, the anthropomorphic frog that has become the emblematic meme of the alt-right, Gab is a digital playpen for Nazis, white supremacists, men’s rights activists, anti-PC crusaders, Gamergaters, anti-feminists, free speech absolutists, and anyone who loves a solidly offensive joke.

Notifications are sounded with the croak of a frog.

The users feel their perspectives have few homes elsewhere on an internet shaped by the left-tilting values of Silicon Valley, the rejection of which has propelled Gab’s rise.

That made Gab only the latest in a recent spate of online offings.

S., or going to the dark web, a part of the internet where websites can be hosted anonymously but are only accessible via a special browser, like Tor (that’s one thing the Daily Stormer did after being banned).

If these websites hope to be publicly accessible, they will also need to find hosting, as well as shielding from technical attacks, like DDo S protection.

Andrew Anglin, the publisher of the Daily Stormer, told in March that the majority of his site’s traffic comes from Santa Clara County, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

“The average alt-right-ist,” the white supremacist Richard Spencer told the magazine, “is probably a 28-year-old tech-savvy guy working in IT.” Utsav Sanduja, the chief operating officer of Gab, described the “Free Speech Tech Alliance” to me as “a group of 100 engineers plus from Silicon Valley who are working with us behind the scenes to create an alternative infrastructure.” The movement’s goal is to own its own servers and run its own web hosting, domain registrar, DDo S protection software, cloud storage services, and encryption technology, not to mention social networks like Gab and other “free-speech”–centric alternatives, like a You Tube replacement called Pew Tube.

There’s even a small alt-right dating website, Wasp.love, with the tagline, “Preserve your heritage! Dickinson is trying to appeal to investors, though he doesn’t seem hopeful.Gab, and a growing number of its compatriots in the “alt-tech” movement, want to build their own internet, one that can be a haven for hate. We may think of the web as an abstract, open field owned by no one in particular—a legend grounded in its origin as a government project, as well as our tendency to imagine its hard-wiring the way we do other communications infrastructure, like cable or radio airwaves.But the internet is really a series of core services, most of them privately owned and managed, that host content and give users directions to find it.In the past few weeks, American hate groups have found themselves being shut out of the internet, where for years they’ve gathered, growing into thriving and increasingly organized communities online.The gutting began before the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, when companies like Airbnb and Facebook booted some of the event’s organizers from their platforms.

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